Give Me the Moon

Anthropology dweeb. Food lover. Tea enthusiast. Lipstick wearer.

To laugh is to risk appearing a fool.
To weep is to risk appearing sentimental.
To reach out to another is to risk involvement.
To expose feelings is to risk exposing your true self.
To place your ideas and dreams before a crowd is to risk their loss.
To love is to risk not being loved in return.
To hope is to risk pain.
To try is to risk failure.
But risks must be taken, because the greatest hazard in life is to risk nothing.

William Arthur Ward (via wordsnquotes)

(via flannelcupcakes)

Social scientists estimate that 15 to 30 percent, or, “[a]s many as 600,000 to 1.2 million slaves” in antebellum America were Muslims. 46 percent of the slaves in the antebellum South were kidnapped from Africa’s western regions, which boasted “significant numbers of Muslims”.

These enslaved Muslims strove to meet the demands of their faith, most notably the Ramadan fast, prayers, and community meals, in the face of comprehensive slave codes that linked religious activity to insubordination and rebellion. Marking Ramadan as a “new American tradition” not only overlooks the holy month observed by enslaved Muslims many years ago, but also perpetuates their erasure from Muslim-American history.

Although the Quran “[a]llows a believer to abstain from fasting if he or she is far from home or involved in strenuous work,” many enslaved Muslims demonstrated transcendent piety by choosing to fast while bonded. In addition to abstaining from food and drink, enslaved Muslims held holy month prayers in slave quarters, and put together iftars - meals at sundown to break the fast - that brought observing Muslims together. These prayers and iftars violated slave codes restricting assembly of any kind.

For instance, the Virginia Slave Code of 1723 considered the assembly of five slaves as an “unlawful and tumultuous meeting”, convened to plot rebellion attempts. Every state in the south codified similar laws barring slave assemblages, which disparately impacted enslaved African Muslims observing the Holy Month.

Therefore, practicing Islam and observing Ramadan and its fundamental rituals, for enslaved Muslims in antebellum America, necessitated the violation of slave codes. This exposed them to barbaric punishment, injury, and oftentimes, even death. However, the courage to observe the holy month while bonded, and in the face of grave risk, highlights the supreme piety of many enslaved Muslims.

Ramadan was widely observed by enslaved Muslims. Yet, this history is largely ignored by Muslim American leaders and laypeople alike - and erased from the modern Muslim American narrative.

Ramadan: A centuries-old American tradition | Al Jazeera (via simhasanam)

I want everyone to read this. The general (though unspoken) conception is that Ramadan and Islam in general is a religious practice that began in great numbers in the West with the influx of Arab and South Asian immigrants and that is far from the truth and a grave injustice to the contributions of Black Americans. Islam has been here and its foundation began with them.

(via maarnayeri)

(via america-wakiewakie)

1. getting addicted to a person based on what you thought they were, how you want them to be, aspects you “believe is inside them somewhere”.

2. craving the attention of someone who has previously been abusive towards you, because you need their confirmation to feel like you are worthy.

3. wanting to “save the beautiful girl who doesn’t know how much she’s worth”, be a hero.

4. enjoying, and eventually craving, the company and attention of someone who shows obvious interest in you, because you’re trying to get over someone else.

5. suddenly seeing someone in a different light because you know they’re in love with you, and you don’t wish to hurt them or lose them.

6. selfishness.

A Few Things That Aren’t Love (via synthetic-synaesthesia)

(via yesixicana)

It’s messing people up, this social pressure to ‘find your passion’ and ‘know what it is you want to do’. It’s perfectly fine to just live your moments fully and marvel as many small and large passions, many small and large purposes, enter and leave your life. For many people there is no realization, no bliss to follow, no discovery of your life’s purpose. This isn’t sad, it’s just the way things are. Stop trying to find the forest and just enjoy the trees.

Sally Coulter 
(via birthofasupervillain)

I think the important thing is enjoying your life and living it for yourself. This find your passion shit is always related to careers and making money because that’s the definition of success to people. If you work at a coffee shop and go home to a tiny apartment but the love of your life is there waiting for you and you’re content, that’s the greatest success you could ever achieve.

(via marzuku)

(via lajefadelasjefas)

Call Me Irresponsible

imelectrofuse:

Dinah Washington – “Call Me Irresponsible”

"Call me irresponsible - call me unreliable
Throw in undependable too
Do my foolish alibis bore you
Well I’m not too clever - I just adore you

Call me unpredictable - tell me I’m impractical

Rainbows I’m inclined to pursue
Call me irresponsible - yes I’m unreliable
But it’s undeniably true - I’m irresponsibly mad for you.”

(via thechanelmuse)

sageoftenpaths:

odditiesoflife:

The Tiny Rock Restaurant in the Sea

At beautiful Michanwi Pingwe Beach on Zanzibar’s coast in Africa is an incredibly unique restaurant. The restaurant is so small, it’s perched on a fossilized bed of coral located in the Indian ocean. Another surprise is that the interior is quite different than the interior. To reach the restaurant, it’s either a walk or boat ride because when the tide comes in, the restaurant is surrounded by water. The spot is so spectacular that it has been used by Vogue magazine for photo shoots.

The restaurant serves a wide variety of seafood as well as wine, beer and soft drinks. However, the Rock Restaurant is a little more pricey than one might expect. The least expensive items on the menu are the mango salad, octopus salad and fish carpaccio — each priced at $14.00 USD. The most expensive menu item is the Rock Special with grilled lobster, cigal, jumbo prawn, fish filet and calamari oil for $48.00 USD. But if you can make it to Zanzibar for a visit, a trip to the restaurant is a must.

sources 1, 2, 3, 4

bruhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh

(via lajefadelasjefas)

hylianears:

micdotcom:

Canadian music festival takes huge step against Native appropriation

Follow micdotcom 

From their announcement:

For various reasons, Bass Coast Festival is banning feathered war bonnets, or anything resembling them, onsite. Our security team will be enforcing this policy.

We understand why people are attracted to war bonnets. They have a magnificent aesthetic. But their spiritual, cultural and aesthetic significance cannot be separated.

Bass Coast Festival takes place on indigenous land and we respect the dignity of aboriginal people. We have consulted with aboriginal people in British Columbia on this issue and we feel our policy aligns with their views and wishes regarding the subject. Their opinion is what matters to us.

(via lafwayfway)